Tag: chocolate

Chocolate Lovers Are Sweeter!

Posted in Chocolate Babies, parenting, pregnancy, science by jenapincott on November 15, 2011

Not long ago, someone emailed me a new study on chocolate and temperament. The study came from a group of psychologists at North Dakota State University and Gettysburg College, and it involved personality differences between people who liked sweet foods versus bitter, spicy, sour, salty, or umami flavors. The researchers wanted to know, “Is having a sweet tooth related to having a sweeter disposition?”

Here’s a sample of what they asked their hundred or so volunteers.

Candy, caramel, chocolate cake, honey, ice cream, maple syrup, pears, raisins, strawberries, and sugar. How fond were they of these dessert flavors?

The volunteers rated their taste preferences on a scale of 1-10.

Following that, they completed an agreeableness scale. That is, they were asked to indicate the extent to which they behave in ways reflective of high (e.g., “have a soft heart”) versus low (e.g., “insult people”) levels of agreeableness.

Pleasingly, the researchers found a significant correlation. People who loved sweets were likelier to be more agreeable.

“Further proof that chocolate lovers would have sweeter babies!” my sender gushed. There’s logic here: If people with a sweet tooth really have a sweeter disposition then women who love sweets might have more agreeable babies because disposition is heritable. Equally valid, people who have sweeter dispositions would have a gentler parenting style, resulting in babies with sweeter dispositions. Ergo, chocolate lovers have sweeter babies. Natch.

Then the researchers took their study to the next level to see if sweet-toothed types not only test as more agreeable, but act sweeter too.

At the end of the session, participants were told that the study was over and that full participation credit would be awarded, thereby relieving them of any further obligations. However, it was mentioned that a colleague in the English department was collecting data on media preferences and was looking for volunteers.

Interestingly, people who had a sweet tooth were more likely to complete the voluntary survey, even though they weren’t getting any extra credit or compensation.

Such sweethearts!

I wonder: does the mere suggestion of sweet food make people act sweeter? Does sweet food make people less angry and aggressive? The researchers claim that metaphors can be predictive about behavior and personality. Because “sweet” in English applies to both taste and disposition, does the correlation still apply in different languages?

How sweet would that be?

Why do women say chocolate trumps sex?

Posted in news by jenapincott on January 29, 2009

chocolaterex_468x481Ask most people what they lust after and the likely answer is chocolate. Ravishing a candy bar or a cup of hot cocoa, chocoholics claim to have chocasms. Chocolate lust is so intense that informal surveys in Europe and the United States report that about half their female participants prefer chocolate to sex.

One good explanation for this is that chocolate consumption is so often compared to sexual consummation, or a precursor thereof. But here’s the rub: there’s no proof that chocolate will lift the libido. If it has any amorous properties, they’re limited and vary from person to person. As detailed in BLONDES, chocolate contains neurotransmitters that might have a minor effect on the brain, but the scant amount in chocolate is rapidly metabolized. Chocolate is also a minor stimulant due to a caffeine-like property, and it contains the anti-clotting agent flavanol. Yes, it may be good for your heart, but researchers found no difference in sexual arousal between women who eat three servings of daily and none at all.

So why do many women say they’d rather unwrap a candy bar than roll in the sheets? Chocolate never disappoints is a glib answer, but there is something to be said for reliable pick-me-ups. The addition of sugar and fat in chocolate bars can raise your serotonin and dopamine levels, which lift your mood and energy levels. The stuff hits the reward-and-addiction circuits of the brain in the way that sex and other rewarding experiences do.

But why are there more female than male chocoholics? One theory is that serotonin levels are low in premenstrual women, and chocolate is a sweet way to perk ourselves up. (In fact, women’s desire for chocolate does seem to follow menstrual patterns.) But if that were so, wouldn’t any carbohydrate do — why crave chocolate and not candy canes? The answer could be that chocolate is unique. It has an unrivaled texture, aroma, and mouth-feel. It’s silken, sinful, and indulgent. Aided and abetted by (the serotonin-enhancing) milk and butter, it’s also a tactile marvel — it literally melts to your touch. It’s rich, complex, and sensual.

Perhaps the proper question is not how chocolate compares to sex. Ask instead how your lovers could be more like chocolate.

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