Category: media

The Science of Nesting

Posted in Chocolate Lovers, magazine articles, media, parenting, pregnancy, psychology by jenapincott on January 8, 2012

In this month’s Pregnancy & Newborn Magazine is an article on the science behind nesting. I offered theories that explain why pregnant women — especially those who are about to give birth — feel an odd and obsessive urge to clean and organize.

Our Selves, Others’ Cells

Posted in Chocolate Babies, media, pregnancy, psychology, science, sex by jenapincott on January 4, 2012

Check out in BOING BOING one of my favorite excerpts from Chocolate Lovers — on the very weird science of what fetal cells do in mothers’ bodies.

“Chocolate Lovers” in Urban Baby!

Posted in Chocolate Lovers, media, parenting, pregnancy, science by jenapincott on October 22, 2011

Today I was thrilled to see a mention of Chocolate Lovers in one of my favorite parenting sites, Urban Baby.

Publishers Weekly — First Review for Chocolate Lovers!

Posted in book reviews, magazine articles, media, news, parenting, pregnancy, science, sex by jenapincott on August 4, 2011

My first review for Do Chocolate Lovers Have Sweeter Babies?, from this week’s Publishers Weekly.

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Do Chocolate Lovers Have Sweeter Babies: Exploring the Surprising Science of Pregnancy
Jena Pincott. Free Press, $15 trade paper (256p) ISBN 978-1-4391-8334-2
Science writer Pincott (Do Gentlemen Really Prefer Blondes?) began her research when she was pregnant; her daughter was born during the writing process, and she describes the work as “curiosity -driven,” urging readers to flip to the pages that interest them most. As Pincott negotiates her pregnancy, she explores a wide array of subjects expectant parents will find utterly captivating, drawing from studies in evolutionary psychology, biology, social science, neuroscience, reproductive genetics, endocrinology, and largely from research in the field of epigenetics, the influence of environment on the behavior of genes. She examines each phase of her own pregnancy, addressing odor and taste aversions (the “gag list”), vivid dreams, how diet affects a gene’s behavior, and a wealth of other subjects. She delves into how dads react to pregnancy (many put on weight) and makes the remarkable observation that what grandma ate when pregnant way back when may influence the baby’s future health (“I’m eating for two generations,” she quips). While readers will be entertained and fascinated by this text from start to finish, the concluding chapter, “Lessons from the Lab,” offers expectant mothers a valuable summary of practical research-based tips (moderate stress experienced by mom may actually be good for the fetus; eating a chocolate bar a day may improve baby’s temperament). Pincott writes with humor and vibrancy, bringing science to life.

Eternal Sunshine of the Springtime Mind

Posted in magazine articles, media, science by jenapincott on May 28, 2011

Warm weather isn’t just good for the flowers. Sunny days have been linked to higher stock returns, and touching a warm object can make people more generous. My article in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal.

Why Your Brain Is Better in Love

Posted in media by jenapincott on January 8, 2011

A re-post of my interview with David DiSalvo on his fascinating Neuronarrative column at Psychology Today.

Mají páni radši blondýnky?

Posted in media by jenapincott on November 12, 2010

Now in Czech by Jena Pincottová!

Guardian’s Internet pick for “sex research revelations”

Posted in media by jenapincott on August 23, 2010

Today the Guardian selected this blog as one of its Internet Picks of the Week!

I will return from my hiatus soon….Stay posted.

“Blondes” in the Washington Post

Posted in media, news by jenapincott on July 11, 2010

At 40+ weeks pregnant still happy to talk about men’s bodies….Here’s a fun article in today’s WaPo on the hot soccer players of the World Cup, with mention of BLONDES.

WSJ Saturday Essay

Posted in magazine articles, media, news by jenapincott on March 27, 2010


Here’s a link to my essay in today’s Wall Street Journal. To attract attention, the WSJ gave it a lightning-rod title: “Why Women Don’t Go For Macho Men.” Men, please stop sending me hate mail! My article — and the study on which it is based — are more nuanced.

(The print edition has the title “The Masculine Mystique,” which inspires an entirely different response.)

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